a-little-bit-pre-raphaelite

a-little-bit-pre-raphaelite:

A different way of portraying Jesus.

Christ in the House of His Parents, 1858-9, Millais modelled Jesus and the holy family on his own friends and family, setting them in a carpenters workshop which he painted from life using a London workshop, it was these points which brought him great criticism: the showing the holy family as normal and lowly and them living in dirty surroundings. Millais also used symbolism such as Jesus’ hand caught on a nail: the future stigmata.

Hunt took the premonition of death to the forefront of his painting in ‘The Shadow of Death, 1870-3, Christ is shown casting a shadow of his future crucifixion on the carpenters wall.

William Dyce takes Jesus out of the carpenters workshop and into the open air to show his loneliness in ‘The Man of Sorrows’ 1860; instead of portraying Jesus in the baren desert he shows him in the Scottish highlands, this makes the image more tangible: showing him in surroundings more familiar to the viewing public.

Rebloging for Good Friday

18 Stunners for one of my first followers preraphobbit/loooooogclaw/Emma on her 18th Birthday

stunner was a term used by Rossetti to describe his ideal of a beautiful woman, this did not fit the conventions of the time and few stunners were already models, they were instead friends, family, wives, lovers, and strangers approached by the PRB, women who often later became lovers, wives and friends.

Elizabeth Siddal by Rossetti
Mary Pinnock by J.M Cameron
Effie Millais by Millais
Emma Hill by Ford Maddox Brown
Alexa Wilding by Rossetti
Fanny Cornforth by Rossetti
Christina Spartali (sister of Marie) by J.M Cameron
Marie Spartali Stillman by Ford Maddox Brown
Maria Zambaco (cousin of Marie) by Burne-Jones
Jane Morris by Rossetti
Keomi Gray by Frederick Sandys
Mary Hillier by J.M Cameron
Bessie Keene by Burne-Jones
Fanny Eaton by Solomon
Ellen Smith by Rossetti
Annie Miller by Boyce
Emily Knewstub by W.J Knewstub
Julia Stephen by J.M Cameron

Palm Sunday by Christina Rossetti 

I LIFT mine eyes, and see
Thee, tender Lord, in pain upon the tree,
Athirst for my sake and athirst for me.

'Yea, look upon Me there,
Compassed with thorns and bleeding everywhere,
For thy sake bearing all, and glad to bear.’

I lift my heart to pray:
Thou Who didst love me all that darkened day,
Wilt Thou not love me to the end alway?

'Yea, thee My wandering sheep,
Yea, thee My scarlet sinner slow to weep,
Come to Me, I will love thee and will keep.’

Yet am I racked with fear:
Behold the unending outer darkness drear,
Behold the gulf unbridgeable and near!

'Nay, fix thy heart, thine eyes,
Thy hope upon My boundless sacrifice:
Will I lose lightly one so dearbought prize?’

Ah Lord, it is not Thou,
Thou that wilt fail; yet woe is me, for how
Shall I endure who half am failing now?

'Nay, weld thy resolute will
To Mine: glance not aside for good or ill:
I love thee; trust Me still and love Me still.’

Yet Thou Thyself hast said,
When Thou shalt sift the living from the dead
Some must depart shamed and uncomforted.

'Judge not before that day:
Trust Me with all thy heart, even tho’ I slay:
Trust Me in love, trust on, love on, and pray.’


Detail of photograph by W. Eugene Smith (b.1918)

Palm Sunday by Christina Rossetti

I LIFT mine eyes, and see
Thee, tender Lord, in pain upon the tree,
Athirst for my sake and athirst for me.

'Yea, look upon Me there,
Compassed with thorns and bleeding everywhere,
For thy sake bearing all, and glad to bear.’

I lift my heart to pray:
Thou Who didst love me all that darkened day,
Wilt Thou not love me to the end alway?

'Yea, thee My wandering sheep,
Yea, thee My scarlet sinner slow to weep,
Come to Me, I will love thee and will keep.’

Yet am I racked with fear:
Behold the unending outer darkness drear,
Behold the gulf unbridgeable and near!

'Nay, fix thy heart, thine eyes,
Thy hope upon My boundless sacrifice:
Will I lose lightly one so dearbought prize?’

Ah Lord, it is not Thou,
Thou that wilt fail; yet woe is me, for how
Shall I endure who half am failing now?

'Nay, weld thy resolute will
To Mine: glance not aside for good or ill:
I love thee; trust Me still and love Me still.’

Yet Thou Thyself hast said,
When Thou shalt sift the living from the dead
Some must depart shamed and uncomforted.

'Judge not before that day:
Trust Me with all thy heart, even tho’ I slay:
Trust Me in love, trust on, love on, and pray.’

Detail of photograph by W. Eugene Smith (b.1918)